Vom Elefanten, der Passanten dressiert
Stader Tageblatt about "Caromboat"
8 August 2013 - German

"Blinded by silence"- Garageland Magazine
Chris Koning about "The Silence"
August 2012 - English

DUST Magazine online
Publication of "The Silence" and "48.085"
July 2012 - English

Suspiria
The Gaelic poet Derry O'Sullivan reads his own interpretation of Rudolf Reiber's show SUSPIRIA
May 2012 - Gaelic, English

Mundane Most Beautiful
Review of Suspiria, published in artlyst
29 May 2012 - English

Spoonfed
review of Suspiria
May 2012 - English

Under the Surface
published in Art Critiqued, an art blog by Bradley Hayman about A Whiter Shade of Pale
June 21st, 2011 - English

jotta.com
review of the Slade School of Art - MA/MFA Show 2011
June 21st, 2011 - English

to not fall asleep
art blog by Lutz Eitel about Caromboat
October 3rd, 2010 - English

Hans & Helga
Marcus Graf interviews Rudolf Reiber about his works in the exhibition
2010 - English

Ocean and Skies
Opening Speech by Paul Guérin, „Ocean and Skies“, Strasbourg,
March 4th, 2010 - French

German Skies for Christmas
Tommi Brem about German Skies,
January 22nd, 2010 - English

Cold Comfort
Sermon by Pastor Helmut A. Müller on Cold Comfort, 48085 and Dark Matter
November 8th, 2009 - German

Luft holen
Eröffnungs-Rede, Dr. Andrea Jahn, freie Kuratorin Stuttgart
Gauthier Sibillat und Rudolf Reiber zu Gast in der Kunststiftung Baden-Württemberg
October 7th, 2009 - German

KUNST Magazin
Sammlergespräch: Interview between Tommi Brem and Jan Kage, Hannah Nehb
June 9th, 2009 - German

art, das Kunstmagazin
Radar: Rik Reinking über Rudolf Reiber
June 30th, 2008 - German

Kunstforum international
BAND 178, 2005, Ausstellunge: Berlin, S. 287
2005 - german

 

"Vom Elefanten, der Passanten dressiert"
Grit Klempow about Sculpturenprojekt Stade

8 August 2013
Stader Tageblatt

> download article as pdf

top

Vom Elefanten, der Passanten dressiert
Letzter Teil der Serie zum Skulpturenprojekt in den Wallanlagen: Schau leidet unter Vandalismus
Von Grit Klempow

...Während Burwitz' Skulptur standhaft im Grün ist, muss das "Caramboat" von Rudolf Reiber auf dem Burggraben an der Schiffertorsstraße ständig wieder mit den unerlässlichen drei Billardkugeln bestückt werden. Stades Kulturchef Dr. Andreas Schäfer hortet schon den Nachschub. Das Boot mit Billardfläche dümpelt auf dem Wasser, dessen Bewegungen auch die Kugeln in Gang setzen. Mit seiner Skulptur hat Reiber sowohl das Boot als auch den Billardtisch seinem Zweck entfremdet, weder die eine noch die andere Nutzung funktioniert noch. Widersinnig dabei: Obwohl die Billardfläche in der Waage, also "im Wasser" ist, gibt es keinen Stillstand für die Kugeln.

Das Ersetzen der Kugeln ist fürSchäfer noch das kleinere Übel.Viel mehr macht der Stadt der Vandalismus zu schaffen...

> download article as pdf

top

Blinded by silence
Chris Koning about "The Silence"

August 2012
Garageland Magazine
issue fourteen: Film

> http://www.transitiongallery.co.uk/htmlpages/editions/GL14/intro.htm

> download article

top

Rudolf Reiber
Blinded by silence

German artist Rudolf Reiber is interested in language systems and codifications, in subverting or questioning what we may take for granted both visually and conceptually. When we think we communicate, are we being understood? And can we rely on our interpretations of cultural forms, tropes, genres? Reiber uses a variety of methods to prompt us. From silkscreen images of hands acting out sign language sentences and drawings made with braille which sit behind glass, unable to be touched, to installed rooms we cannot enter and pictures we are not allowed to look at, his work is both mute and confounding of expectation and yet somehow still accessible, not just conceptually, but visually.

Reiber has made a 90-minute, 3-D film that is a braille translation of Ingmar Bergman's landmark 1963 film The Silence. Bergman originally wrote of his film that it dealt with 'reduction, the negative imprint'. A classic of modernist cinema, the long, slow-moving, dialogue-less shots form the backbone of the narrative. Reiber's film, which follows the original in length, includes those silences. We see a screen which is an abyss of white noise, and yet when the braille dialogue comes towards us, sitting there in our 3-D glasses, we are no more able to interpret it than if it weren't there. What happens when a visual media gives us an unreadable format? It becomes something else. The contradiction inherent in witnessing the only element of the film that would actually be accessible to someone blind, the sound, become silent, leaves us unsettled and frustrated. On so many levels, we clearly do not share language. And yet the film is more beautiful than expected – and so you end up willingly complicit in your own inability to understand. There is a hypnotic, meditative visual element that leaves one resigned to ones impotence.

Chris Koning

> http://www.transitiongallery.co.uk/htmlpages/editions/GL14/intro.htm

> download article

top

DUST Magazine
online

31July 2012
Publication of "The Silence" and "48.085"

> http://dustmagazine.com/blog/?p=2342/

top

Suspiria
Derry O'Sullivan

May 2012
The Gaelic poet Derry O'Sullivan reads his own interpretation of Rudolf Reiber's show SUSPIRIA

> http://payneshurvell.com/2012/05/suspiria/

> download Gaelic and English version as pdf

top

Suspiria Rudolf Reiber

Cuireann sé le báiní mé,
Do bhosca dúnta
Ar urlár snasta
Faoi sholas lasta
I seomra glasta
Ar chúl an bhalla ghloine!
An féirín nó nathair nimhe atá ann,
Nó cliabhán nó cónra?
Nó scámhóg ag osnaíl?
Gíogann fáinleog i mo chroí:
An mbeadh an samhradh i ndorn leac oighir ann?
Féach: boscaí bána crosfhocail iad
Ár súile gan leid,
Cluas orainn le ceolchoirm do chiúnais gan ghléas,
Rosc gan radharc, cluas gan chloisint
Roimh do bhosca dorchadais i mbroinn an tsolais!
An mbfhearrde sinn thú a oscailt?
An sárófaí Pandóra is an scaoilfí chugainn
An tsíocháin faoi dheireadh?
An é an t-aineolas an sonas?

Derry O'Sullivan
May 2012
Paris

> http://payneshurvell.com/2012/05/suspiria/

> download Gaelic and English version as pdf

top

Mundane Most Beautiful

29 May 2012
Review of Suspiria, published in artlyst by Emily Sack

> www.artlyst.com

> download article as pdf

top

Rudolf Reiber 's Suspiria
Mundane Most Beautiful

Approaching Payne Shurvell visitors are promptly informed that they cannot enter the gallery through the main entrance. The industrial courtyard does not offer any clues. Soon visitors are lead on a meandering route inside the building complex causing a slight feeling of disorientation. This theme of uncertainty and mild discomfort characterize Rudolf Reiber's first London solo exhibition, Suspira.

Upon reaching the back door of the gallery a sealed wooden crate stands by itself in the centre of the space. The crate houses a mysterious painting, a painting no one has seen except for the artist. What is on the 32x39cm board is unknown in every aspect except its name, 'Secret'. Even directors Joanne Shurvell and James Payne are in the dark regarding the painting's content. 'Secret' challenges the viewers' expectations by making the art object completely inaccessible. It's as if the crate becomes a performance piece taunting the viewers and exciting their curiosity – almost as an artistic interpretation of one of philosophy's great conundrums: Schrodinger's Cat.

The roundabout entrance to the gallery was not merely for effect but to protect 'Losing Ground', where the gallery floor becomes a piece of art. Reiber spent weeks in the gallery space chipping away layers upon layers of paint to reveal the bottommost surface. The artist then polished the floor multiple times before covering it with resin resulting in a smooth, shinning, and almost reflective surface. This laborious undertaking calls to mind the roles of addition and subtraction in the process of creation and highlights the beauty of a commonly overlooked plane. The desire to keep the floor pristine prohibits visitors from accessing the wooden crate of 'Secret'.

The expanse of the main gallery is left mostly vacant of objects (this, of course, does not translate to a vacuous space – there is an energy and an aura in the unknown and the unseen). By contrast, the small office and hallway become exhibition spaces to house several other works. 'No Room for Interpretation' features a series of hand gestures presumably stating the title in sign language. 'The Silence' consists of 54 sheets of A4 paper inscribed with Braille. A film also called 'The Silence' uses 3D imagery to project the Braille symbols. These three works involve language and communication but are intentionally difficult to read. There is an almost cruel irony in using Braille text that cannot actually be read by blind people and the juxtaposition of touch and sight causes tension between the viewer and the work.

Lastly Reiber's 'German Skies' series (2008) explores colour using lacquer used in German military planes as his medium. These works are simple colourfield paintings, but the choice of medium adds a violent undertone felt but not seen.

On the surface Suspiria is highly minimalistic, but the contrast of tender nuances and tension-filled silences create a dynamic and challenging atmosphere. Rudolf Reiber makes the mundane both beautiful and untouchable and renders language incommunicable.

Words Emily Sack © ArtLyst 2012

> www.artlyst.com

> download article as pdf

top

Spoonfed

May 2012
Review of Suspiria 2012

> www.spoonfed.co.uk

top

After their recent solo show for Daniel Rapley, PayneShurvell continue to explore ideas around faith and the visitor experience with this exhibition of work by contemproary artist Rudolf Reiber.

Just as Rapley claimed to have transcribed the entire Bible by hand (but exhibited it in such a way as you could only take his word for it) so Reiber has transformed the gallery with a highly polished concrete floor that you're not allowed to walk on and a painting that you're not allowed to see.

Brilliant!

> www.spoonfed.co.uk

top

Art Critiqued
Under the Surface

June 21st, 2011
Extract of an art blog by Bradley Hayman

> http://artcritiqued.com

> download full article as pdf

top

...
Meanwhile Rudolf Reiber‘s A Whiter Shade of Pale at the Slade looks at a different framing structure of art. At first glance it appears to be a white gallery space that hasn’t been filled but on a second glance some labels stand out which indicate the walls have each been painted in the favoured white paint of some of the world’s renowned museum galleries. In essence this is a very bland piece conceptually, but its subtlety underlies the work, whereby when fully entering the room and becoming absorbed by the work, as the viewer is absorbed by the institutions from which the paint choices arise or indeed by the institution this work is in, you discover the phenomenon of the subtle differences of shade. Hence the work proves that white isn’t necessary white (though you only need to see a paint chart to know that), in the sense that a photograph may not necessarily tell the absolute truth about its subject, and Reiber applies this reading to these art institutions. Even if you were to analyse the RGB or CMYK content of the finish, the paints appear even more different according to the quality and tone of light landing on each wall, meaning that the work has to be experienced in the space it was made for
...

> http://artcritiqued.com

> download full article as pdf

top

Jotta
Degree Shows: Slade School of Art MAFA 2011

June 21st, 2011
Extract of an article by James Cahill

> http://www.jotta.com/jotta/

> download full article as pdf

top

The annual art school degree shows throw up some of the most experimentaland bewildering art around. True to form, this year’s Slade MA/MFA presents arambling yet revealing survey of a new generation of artists. Unshackled fromcuratorial argument, 70 young international artists have installed the endproducts of their two-year courses throughout the Slade’s labyrinthine studios.

...

At the conceptual end of the scale, Rudolf Reiber’s installation A Whiter Shade ofPale, which at first glance resembles an empty room, consists of four wallspainted the exact shade of white used in four major museums (MoMA, TateModern etc.). This provides a wry insight into the standardised systems andpractices which pervade such institutions.

...

> http://www.jotta.com/jotta/

> download full article as pdf

top

to not fall asleep

art blog by Lutz Eitel about Caromboat
OCTOBER 3, 2010

> tonotfallasleep.blogspot.com

> download as pdf

top

To drown and never be heard of again

carombolage boot

This is the first post in a small series where I invite artists I know and like to send me an image of something they’ve done without much information except the technical data. I will then proceed to wrack my poor brains and see how far I get. The above image will in any case be the easiest of the run, since I’m probably the world’s leading expert on Rudolf Reiber. Ha! So much so that while I had not seen his Caromboat (2010) before he mailed me the photo, it already felt familiar, because he once had told me over a beer: “I’m taking a boat next and will be putting a billiard tabletop in it.” I immediately retorted with what every sane person would think, as long as they’d be anchored to the real world by a beer: “What in the hell would you want to do that for?” And like most of the good artists I know, Rudolf didn’t launch into a lecture about boats and billiards and their inherent meaning, but just said: “Wait. It’s gonna be good, you’ll see.”

I probably should have spoiler-tagged the image above. Because, let’s stay with the artist’s declaration of intent for the moment: it can actually prove a ballast pretty hard to throw overboard—and has been for me. I sort of had to reacquaint myself with the reality of a project that had seemed sort of exhausted once I had turned Rudolf’s description of it over in my mind for a couple of times. While it’s very easy to translate this piece (like many of Rudolf’s) into immediate words, I certainly wouldn’t choose the Caromboat to explain what the he’s up to to anyone, it just doesn’t sound good enough in words. I’d rather mention the work where he put an alarm system on an empty gallery wall, or the one where he blotted out all the stars in the sky of a Thomas Ruff artprint. These two seem much better when you translate them into words, because they’re more meta, they relate to Yves Klein exhibiting a void, or Rauschenberg erasing de Kooning, and all of that is mothered not by Cage’s silent piece itself, but by Cage saying that the audience didn’t have to experience the work personally, it would be enough to know it existed. That is to say, we’re on safe ground.

Anyway, I simply couldn’t help judging Rudolf’s piece before actually seeing it. And it didn’t make for a good story. While this is art you sometimes can easily put into words, these words can top the work like a bad haircut.

pendulum

To continue in the same mold, I should probably have written about it blindfolded. Rudolf sowing the references, me reaping the connotations. The boat is almost too easy, German romanticism, Böcklin, but also Dante, Homer (Winslow as well as the Odyssey dude), Jerome K. Jerome, Hitchcock, you name it: a boat is a vessel to carry meaning. And then billiards . . . well, actually I have to seriously mention one table there, because else you wouldn’t trust me anymore, and that is from Gabriel Orozco. The artist made it elliptical and constructed a setting where the red ball sort of bombs the other two from above. Elliptical table of course stands for the world; apart from that the work seems about the game itself to a surprising degree, it’s like the revenge of the red ball, that’s the one you usually don’t play, is it?

While now I could go on and list the similarities and differences between the two works, it would get me nowhere, because the objects modified in these pieces that can be translated into simple sentences do not really seem susceptible to classical iconography, they’re still too much the things they were before they ever dreamed about becoming art when they’d grow up. They represent reality that’s been willfully screwed with (and I’m sure the beer still figures in here somewhere).

biliard

[Interlude: When my brother and I became old enough to spend our afternoons in front of the tv screen, as is proper, our family suddenly had a sort of spare playroom. It wasn’t sufficiently large for table tennis, so they decided to get a smallish pool table. While that soon became no more than another powerless tool to try and kill time with, the table always kept a certain media-supported glamour (The Hustler!), something of an elementary coolness (plus on the few occasions when later in life I was in a situation to play, I proved myself rather more adept than most of my unsuspecting playing partners). Though the thing standing there through my early teen years means I of course will never again have a desire to play again, I still remember its green surface with fondness, it speaks to me of the profound luxury of boredom, that is the privilege of youth. (Both of which I’ll never enjoy again.)]

So now, instead of having everything figured out beforehand, I will actually have to think about the thing, because I have a photo. Look above. (I haven’t seen the darn canoe in the flesh, by the way, and I don’t intend to, and anyone who tells you that you can’t talk about art which you haven’t seen in the original is a capitalist dead bent to destroy the frigging ozone layer. I’m serious.)

Part of what immediately endears me to the boat is that I know how they do the so-called Gartenschau, the landscape park on parade, here in Germany. Carefully groomed recreational areas within city limits—touched up not to provide little pockets of nature with prescribed viewing points like in English gardening, and not to rape nature just to prove the superiority of reason like in French gardening, but to furnish the green, make it inoffensive, habitable, and mildly useful. Within that, the boat is really an outpost of art in public space in general, which is usually about power structures—and you could argue that the best examples of that sad genre are probably the most reprehensible in their gender policies, but that’s for another post.

So rather, let’s walk the knoll like Diderot used to walk the academy into a painting, looking not for motif and meaning, but for psychology. The Caromboat is like a creature, maybe restricted in the sort of sense it makes, or rather, a mutation maybe senseless in itself (like all good mutations are before evolution harnesses them), and one that will not reproduce—there will be no billiard boats throughout the history of art like there are ferries into the nether lands. But there it is, and it has a vibe.

The boat houses three billiard balls that have an inclination to react against the elements together, they huddle more than they smack each other, they wouldn’t want any outright confrontation, that would be more drama than they could take. (The lake they live in might be small by objective standards, but it is completely sufficient for a billiard ball to drown in and never be heard of again.) So the balls seem to depend on each other. They stay close, following each other’s movements; there’s nothing they can do against their situation, but they can gain some solace from a solidarity which stands in opposition to the game they were originally created to serve.

Any object with sufficient mass creates gravity that longs for company from any other object.

But Rudolf, what if it rains?

> tonotfallasleep.blogspot.com

> download as pdf

top


HANS & HELGA

> download as pdf

top

Marcus Graf interviews Rudolf Reiber:

Marcus Graf: Could you please describe with a few sentences your work that you have shown at the exhibition.
What is it about and what were its formal parameters as well as conceptual issues that you were interested in?

Rudolf Reiber: So let‘s begin with „German Skies“, which is a work in three parts, consisting of three monochrome dull painted plates of aluminium. The three colours, „Sky Blue“, „Sky Grey“ and „Sky“ are exactly the colour shades of the planes the Royal Air Force used in World War II to bomb German cities. The bottoms of the bombers were painted with these colours to camouflage them in the German sky.

For „Unter vier Augen“, in English maybe best translated as „ tête-à-tête“, I compiled excerpts from internet pornography and set them to the rhythm of a waltz in the soundtrack. So what I did was sample portraits of the performers, or rather: of the moments they gaze into the camera. Those gazes are meant for the viewer and suggest he could be part of the ostensibly joyful experience. The video, when installed in public, can only be seen through a peephole in the wood panelling that closes off a recess in the facade.

Finally „Untitled“ is a polished one-euro coin. I ground a Greek one Euro coin with sandpaper until the coin‘s image was erased. Then I gave it a high polish, which reflects the observer. At the end, the question arises, how much the coin is still worth.

M.G.: Let us talk a bit about “German Sky”. In this work, you use minimal monochrome painting for dealing with an important part of Germany’s history. At the same time, the translocation from the airplanes to the art-panels gives the work a sense of irony. How important is it for you that the spectator knows about the meaning and history of the colours?

R.R.: First of all, I think every work should function without any commentary, and I hope „German Skies“ does so too. To achieve this I especially cared for the surface and the quality of the colours. I painted, sanded, repainted and sanded them again and again until they got this really smooth surface with the colour still looking dull. The result was that if your are looking from aside, they really appear shiny, but if you are standing in front of them, you can‘t find your reflection in it. This is what everyone can experience without any knowledge about the origin of the colours or any knowledge in art history.
But of course most of the conceptual art today needs a kind of explanation, especially for spectators who are not so aware of the discussions and their histories. However everybody who is aware of the history in modern art will compare the panels with the monochromes of Malewitsch, Rodtchenko, Rauschenberg and so on, but will be surprised by the „unclean“ colours.
And then there is the title, which could give a solution, but seems to be just another trap as the colours don‘t look like colours of the sky.
So, I think one should have a free look on the panels, but also have the opportunity to find out more about the background of the colours, which could be given through a publication like this and a handout given for free by the gallery.

M.G.: I love this work, because it is a very current and appropriate way of how art can deal with history and its politics. I understand this work as subversively engaged without being didactic. How important is social or political engagement in your work? What kind of possibilities do you see for art being socially interested and active?

R.R.: I like it how you call the work subversive without being didactic. And being didactic is exactly what I am trying to avoid.
But actually I don‘t like my work being described as political. Especially not the „Skies“. I never wanted to blame the British for bombing Germany, or construct a revisionist history.
Besides I don‘t like most of this so called „political“ or „engaged“ art these days. Most of it is in my opinion too didactic and boring. For instance, when I encounter works in an exhibition that seem to belong more to social documentary, I feel like I‘m back in school, when I had to endure all these ambition films shown by my R.E. teacher. Not that I don‘t like these sort of films, but I prefer to watch them on TV. And there are plenty of them, just better made. I think art never has changed the world.
But there are exceptions like for example Francis Alys. Particularly like his poetic approach, and I hope you can find this in my „political“ works as well.

M.G.: Often, like we see it in the three pieces in the exhibition, irony and humour are an integral part of your work.

R.R.: I love irony, because you can deal with heavy subjects without being too moral and it is an easy way to catch the audience.

M.G.: Discussing the formal side of your work, it seems to be very deeply influenced by minimal art.

R.R.: Is it? Well, it evolved quiet early in my work that I tried to concentrate on the essential. Rather trying to omit than to add something. „Untitled“ is an early example of it. I have sanded and polished it until it reveals it‘s true character. And so I did in many of my later works, but I would not call this minimal art. And talking about „German Skies“, I would rather call them an ironic commentary about minimal art.

M.G.: Coming now to “Unter vier Augen”. The work deals with presentation and voyeurism. Still, you do not expose any manual for the spectator, and do not impose any message. What was the starting point of this work?

R.R.: I developed this piece for an exhibition, which should spread all over a nice little village in southern Germany called Ettlingen. There was a competition where I was asked to create a work for the public. And of course, they were thinking about something nice. So I thought what do they expect from me and what is really lovely. A naked well figured female body, that‘s what you can see displayed in bronze or stone all over as public art. So I thought about public, nudity and voyeurism and created something they were not expecting.

M.G.: Besides your video works, also often in your three dimensional pieces and objects like “Untitled”, you integrate the spectator. What role does he play in your work?

R.R.: He plays a big part in my work. Generally speaking, there is no art without a spectator. What‘s an artwork without being seen or discussed? It just doesn't exist!
„Untitled“ or „Unter vier Augen“ could be seen as perfect examples as they are not finished until you see your reflection in the coin or kneel down in front of the girls.
And I like to play with the viewers expectations and prejudices. I think an artist does not even do half of the job, the rest should lay on people like you, critics, art historians, curators and the audience. It‘s your questions, comments and answers make our art feel alive!

> download as pdf

top

 

Ocean and Skies

> download as pdf

top

Opening speech by Paul Guérin, „Ocean and Skies“, Strasbourg,
March 4, 2010

 

L’appropriation par les artistes des nouveaux appareillages techniques de production et de reproduction élaborés par l’ère industrielle n’a pas eu pour seule conséquence de faire émerger, à côté de la peinture et de la sculpture, de nouvelles disciplines comme la photographie, la vidéo, l’installation ou la création d’environnements. Elle a aussi entraîné au fil de la carrière de bon nombre d‘entre eux la création d’oeuvres de nature et de conception tellement différentes que loin de manifester comme par le passé l’évolution d’un « style » – fût-elle dramatiquement marquée par des « ruptures » – il serait presque impossible sans recours à leur documentation de les attribuer à un auteur unique.

C’est singulièrement le cas dans la démarche générale de Rudolf Reiber et plus spécialement avec la série de photographies et la série de peintures, juste séparées par un an d’intervalle, qu’il présente à l’issue de deux résidences, l’une dans l’île de Sylt (au large de la côte atlantique allemande), l’autre à Strasbourg, dont la réunion ne paraîtrait au premier regard qu’arbitraire ou circonstancielle si l’artiste n’y déclarait pas développer un propos relatif « aux couleurs et à leur réception ».

Dans une telle perspective s’éclaire alors le rapprochement d’un ensemble de peintures monochromes avec des photographies d’étendues marines sans aucun bateau, diversement agitées par la houle, sous des cieux aux luminosités brumeuses uniformes mais variables au fil de jours de leurs prises de vue. En intitulant ces photographies « Marines », un terme appartenant à l’ancienne classification des genres de la peinture figurative, Rudolf Reiber procède en effet dans chacune d’entre elles à l’exploration d‘une couleur, raréfiée par l’absence de tout objet ou figure, d‘une façon aussi radicale que Monet le fit de la lumière dans sa série des « Cathédrales ». La tonalité colorée de chaque photographie ne résulte que des interactions lumineuses entre la densité atmosphérique du ciel et son reflet dans une eau frangée d’écume et troublée par les vagues. L’impersonnalité de ces images, nées seulement d’un complexe jeu de reflets entre les éléments naturels trouve alors un juste répondant dans leur enregistrement objectivement neutre par l’appareillage photographique, une telle réserve de l’artiste à l’égard de toute expressivité subjective se révélant peut-être une condition essentielle à son engagement profond dans chacune des techniques et des projets manifestement hétérogènes mis en oeuvre à chacune des étapes du cours apparemment imprévisible de son travail.

 

À considérer la recherche sur la couleur menée dans ces photographies, à peine figuratives de prendre pour motif un espace vide – seul un oiseau apparaît dans l’une d’elles –, on se souviendra qu’une des premières spectatrices d’une oeuvre inspirée par un site assez analogue : le célèbre tableau de Caspar David Friedrich, Moine au bord de la mer, anticipa certaines réactions actuelles à l’art du monochrome en s’indignant de n’y trouver « rien à voir ». Là encore, Reiber pratique un jeu paradoxal dans le choix de ses titres puisqu’il nomme « Ciels allemands » des surfaces d’aluminium recouvertes à chaque fois d’une unique couleur uniformément appliquée au pistolet. Seule une autre pièce intitulée « Gris océan » peut suggérer l’idée d’une interprétation artistique d’un échantillonnage de peintures industrielles. Plus justement qu’une hypothèse de transposition en tableaux d’une pratique de « ready-made » à la Duchamp, on pourrait alors se souvenir du souhait de Frank Stella de « garder (sur ses toiles) la peinture aussi belle que dans le pot »...

En réalité, la couleur entretient dans ces monochromes tout autant une relation à la nature des lieux ainsi désignés qu’à l’histoire européenne puisque la dénomination de chacune d’elle renvoie aux nuanciers utilisés par les modélistes d’avions pour reproduire les teintes des camouflages effectivement portés par le métal des bombardiers anglais dans leurs raids sur l’Allemagne nazie. Si ces oeuvres dépassent par leur propos une signification documentaire pour s’inscrire dans la voie ouverte par Malevitch, c’est bien parce que la couleur dans les premières années du XX° siècle a tout autant porté parfois à elle seule l’aventure de l’abstraction picturale avec la disparition de l’objet que les avancées de l’art militaire avec la dissimulation des hommes et des engins s’affrontant sur un champ de bataille englobant désormais la terre, l’eau et le ciel. Et de même que la production industrielle des couleurs en tube avait ouvert l’accès au plein air des paysagistes de l’impressionnisme, ce furent des peintres – comme Guirand de Scevola et bien sûr Fernand Léger – qui contribuèrent dès ses origines à la technique militaire du camouflage.

Par leur réunion sous le titre d’Océans et Ciels, ces deux ensembles d’oeuvres de Rudolf Reiber donnent une profondeur historique à son art du paysage ( l’île de Sylt fut en effet une base militaire allemande et comme telle cible de bombardements anglais) en même temps qu’ils témoignent d’une cohérence profonde de la démarche multiforme d‘un artiste résidant à la fois à Londres, Francfort et Stuttgart, et trouvant, par sa circulation permanente dans divers pays d’une Europe militairement apaisée, matière pour des recherches autant intellectuelles que plastiques.

Paul Guérin
mars 2010

download as pdf

⇧top

 

German Skies for Christmas

art-blog by Tommi Brem about German Skies,
January 22nd, 2010

> German Skies for Christmas

> download as pdf

⇧top

We were in his studio, talking about some of his works that include the process of “erasure”, such as “Dark Matter” (all the stars removed from a Thomas Ruff work), “ohne Titel” (the face of a 1 Euro coin sanded down to a smooth surface) and some of his video works.

Then he mentioned his latest project, involving another form of erasure: camouflage. He had researched the exact colours used by the British Air Force in WW2 to camouflage their bombers in different kinds of weather. “Sky”, “Sky Blue” and “Sky Grey” … the series is called “German Skies”. He wanted to have huge metal sheets painted in the reproduced, matte colours. And, if I remember correctly, he was already talking about exhibiting them in Ulm, in the atriums of the new Weishaupt Museum, high up in the air so you could actually compare the camouflage effect of the painted metal against the sky.

He did that exhibition and luckily, he also did an edition of smaller versions (17“), each colour is available three times, sold separately.

german skies grey

There are many reasons why I love this work. For one, because it is such a reduced, featureless and simple shape, yet it builds on something horrific and violent. I grew up in Ulm, which was heavily bombed, and the Museum Weishaupt now fills a gap left by the bombing. Reibers work was appropriately placed. My family (from my mother’s side) were refugees from what is now Poland, having first hand experience of the camouflaged planes. Plus the sky above Ulm very often has the colour of “Sky Grey”, a foggy, greenish, featureless haze.

As if that wasn’t enough, the small versions, hand painted and sanded down by the artist, come with an inbuilt surprise. The surface which is matte and almost completely featureless and not reflecting any light becomes a highly reflective surface when viewed from the appropriate angle.

“German Skies: Sky Grey”, painted metal, 33 x 28 x 1 cm

It’s a mirror in which you will never be able to see yourself. This may not be intended by Rudolf, but for me it exemplifies one purpose art has in my life. It’s a means to see the world from a different perspective, rather than a reflection of myself. At the same time, it’s so closely related to my life that it does that, too.

My wife bought this for me for Christmas. My wishlist included “Sky Grey” by Rudolf Reiber or a telescope. I can understand why Rudolf’s work was picked. It’s smaller, easier to store and it’s considerably less expensive than a good telescope.

> German Skies for Christmas

> download as pdf

⇧top

 

Gottesdienst mit Bildpredigt und Orgelimprovisation zur Ausstellung

Pfarrer Helmuth A. Müller about Rudolf Reiber, Cold Comfort, 2009; 48085, 2007,
49 gerahmte Zeichnungen, je 14,8 x 21 cm;
Dark Matter, 2007, Tusche auf Kunstdruck von Thomas Ruff 13h 36m, -35°, 1992
Sonntag, 08. November 2009

> download as pdf

⇧top

 

Liebe Gemeinde,

Rudolf Reiber ist bei der Vorbereitung seiner Ausstellung ‚Cold Comfort’, Kalter Komfort / Schwacher Trost auf zwei Arbeiten gestoßen, die er 2007 geschaffen hat. Die eine Arbeit nennt er ‚48085’. Sie besteht aus 49 gerahmten kleinformatigen Zeichnungen, auf denen genau 48085 schwarze Punkte auf weißem Grund zu finden sind. Die Arbeit ist bei einem Stipendium in Edenkoben entstanden. Als Atelier diente Reiber ein Dachzimmer. Der nächtliche Himmel über dem Pfälzer Wald war von samtenem Schwarz und bei klarem Wetter von Sternen übersät. Kein Lichtermeer, keine Straßenlampe und keine Leuchtreklame störte ihren Glanz. Da Reiber ohnehin zeichnen wollte, hat er den Ausschnitt des Sternenhimmels über sich abgezeichnet, den ihm das Dachfenster im Atelier frei gab. Es sind, Sie wissen es schon, 48085 Sterne geworden. Reiber hat sie nach Fertigstellung der Arbeit drei Tage lang gezählt und die Arbeit nach der Zahl der festgehaltenen Sterne benannt. 48085. Eine ungeheure Zahl. Jeder Punkt auf den Zeichnungen eine ganze Welt. Auf jeder Zeichnung an die tausend Welten. Eine überwältigende Fülle, die zum Grübeln, zum Philosophieren und zum Theologisieren verführt. Wer hat das alles geschaffen? Der Zufall? Eine in der Materie selber liegende physikalische Notwendigkeit? Oder Gott? Glaubst Du an Gott? Glauben Sie an Gott? Glauben wir an Gott?

Rudolf Reiber ist über dem Zeichnen zum Mitschöpfer geworden. Er schafft an seiner künstlerischen Welt. Der Künstler als neuer Schöpfer. „Jeder Mensch ist ein Künstler“ (Joseph Beuys). Jeder Mensch ist wenig niedriger als Gott (Psalm 8, 6). 48085 ist jetzt in der Turmgalerie der Hospitalkirche zu sehen.

Seine zweite Arbeit nennt Reiber ‚Dark Matter’, Dunkle Materie. Sie geht auf einen Kunstdruck von einem von Sternen übersäten Himmel zurück, den der deutsche Fotograf Thomas Ruff 1992 erworben und zur Kunst erklärt hat. Ruff hat sich damals einen von unseren heutigen Riesenteleskopen aufgenommenen Sternenhimmel mit seinen unendlichen Weitern und Welten besorgt. Es sind Sterne ohne Zahl. Reiber nimmt Tusche und löscht jeden einzelnen Stern auf dem Kunstdruck mit Tusche aus. Auf diese Weise entsteht eine differenzierte schwarze Fläche. Er nennt diese Fläche in Erinnerung an die Materie, die nach dem Schluss unserer theoretischen Physik das Weltall nahezu ausfüllt Dark Matter. Wir sehen die Sterne. Die dunkle Materie sehen wir nicht. Der überwiegende Teil des Weltalls bleibt uns verschlossen, obwohl es ihn geben muss. Glauben Sie an Gott? Glauben Sie wirklich an Gott? Das Nachtschwarz des Alls als Ursprung des Zweifels.

Und dann kommt Reiber bei der weiteren Vorbereitung der Ausstellung auf das Buch Kohelet, auf den Prediger zurück. Er schlägt sich eine der letzten Nächte vor der Eröffnung mit dem Buch Prediger um die Ohren, liest seine 12 Kapitel und beginnt zu grübeln. Am meisten beeindruckt ihn das Urteil des abgeklärten Weisen aus dem Ende des dritten oder dem Anfang des zweiten vorchristlichen Jahrhunderts (die Forschung lässt das offen): Alle menschlichen Anstrengungen, sich ein sicheres Fundament für das eigene Leben zu schaffen, sind eitel, ein Haschen nach Wind. Wir haben sein abschließendes Urteil noch im Ohr: „…Ich richtete mein Herz darauf, dass ich lernte Weisheit und erkennte Tollheit und Torheit. Ich war aber gewahr, dass auch dies ein Haschen nach Wind ist“ (Prediger 1, 17). Wenn man sein Leben mit Wohltat zubringt, ist es auch nicht anders als wenn man sich abmüht und Häuser baut und Reichtümer ansammelt. „Als ich ansah alle meine Werke, die meine Hand getan hatte und die Mühe, die ich gehabt hatte, siehe, da war es alles eitel und Haschen nach Wind und kein Gewinn unter der Sonne“ (Prediger 2, 11). Reiber hat sich dann überlegt, wie er das Sprachbild „Haschen nach Wind“ in eine künstlerische Arbeit transformieren kann. Sie wissen, man spürt einen Luftzug und streckt seine Hand aus und will die frische Luft fassen. Man greift nach der Luft und schließt sie in seinen zu Fäusten geballten Händen ein. Man öffnet die Hände wieder und findet nichts. Reibers Überlegung war dann, dass er eines der Fenster der Kirche öffnen könnte. Er sagte sich, ich öffne eines der Fenster und ein Luftzug entsteht. Jeder Besucher der Kirche spürt den Zug, den Wind, den Hauch. Aber, so frage ich, spüren wir auch den Geist Gottes, der mit diesem Windhauch verbunden ist? Den Geist Gottes, der nach dem Schöpfungsbericht am Anfang über den Wassern schwebt, als Gott Himmel und Erde erschuf und als es noch keinen Sternenhimmel gab, der die Nächte überstrahlte? Ich frage mich weiter, ob der Prediger womöglich vergaß, dass der Windhauch mit dem Geist Gottes verbunden ist? Rechnen wir mit dem schöpferischen Geist, der auch uns ins Leben ruft? Gauben wir an Gott?

Mir kommt ein Gegenbild von Friedrich Nietzsche in den Sinn. Im Aphorismus 125 aus der „Fröhlichen Wissenschaft“ bringt Nietzsches toller Mensch eine Welt ganz ohne Gott ins Spiel. Ihm graut selber vor dieser Welt. Sie zerstört alle bisherigen Fundamente. Es gibt kein Halten mehr. „Wohin ist Gott?“ rief der tolle Mensch. „Ich will es Euch sagen! Wir haben ihn getötet, - Ihr und ich! Wir alle sind seine Mörder! Aber wie haben wir dies gemacht? Wie vermochten wir das Meer auszutrinken? Wer gab uns den Schwamm, um einen ganzen Horizont wegzuwischen? Was taten wir, als wir diese Erde von ihrer Sonne losketteten? Wohin bewegt sie sich nun? Wohin bewegen wir uns? Fort von allen Sonnen? Stürzen wir nicht fortwährend? Und rückwärts, seitwärts, vorwärts, nach allen Seiten? Gibt es noch ein Oben und ein Unten? Irren wir nicht wie durch ein unendliches Nichts? Haucht uns nicht der leere Raum an? Ist es nicht kälter geworden? Kommt nicht immerfort die Nacht und noch mehr Nacht? Wie trösten wir uns, die Mörder aller Mörder?“

‚Cold Comfort’, Kalter Komfort/Schwacher Trost nennt Reiber seine Arbeit, bei der er das Fenster öffnet und uns spüren lässt, dass uns der leere Raum anhaucht und wir metaphysisch heimatlos geworden sind, wenn wir die Milchstraßen über uns wie mit einem Schwamm weggewischt haben. Sie wissen vielleicht auch, dass Friedrich Nietzsche nicht geglaubt hat, dass wir mit dem Blick auf die Sterne feste Fundamente finden und bei unserer Suche nach Erkenntnis weiterkommen. Er hält diese Anstrengung für die „Weise der Astronomen. – Solange du noch die Sterne fühlst als ein „Über-dir“, fehlt dir noch der Blick des Erkennenden“ (Friedrich Nietzsche-Werke und Briefe: Viertes Hauptstück. Sprüche und Zwischenspiele. Nietzsche Werke Band 2, Seite 626). Er empfiehlt als Gegenmittel und Ausweg den Blick auf den Menschen. Genauer: den Blick auf den Übermenschen. Ob dieser Blick weiterhilft? „Glaube nicht mehr an Gott, glaube an den Übermenschen!“. Wir haben gehört, dass schon der Prediger dieser Auffassung heftigst widersprochen hat. Alles menschliche Tun bleibt ein Haschen nach Wind; wenn es nur die Tiefe des Alls gibt, die dunkle Materie und den zufällig gewordenen Menschen, hilft auch ein Blick auf den Übermenschen nicht weiter. Was aber dann? Sollen wir doch an Gott glauben?

Ich schlage bei Paulus nach, dem ersten großen christlichen Theologen. Ich gehe davon aus, dass Paulus den Prediger gekannt hat. Und seine Vorstellung, dass alles menschliche Mühen vergeblich und eitel ist. In der Tat: Paulus kennt das Gefühl von Vergeblichkeit. Aber er nennt es anders als der Prediger. Paulus spricht vom Fleisch, griechisch sarx. Was fleischlich gesinnt ist, so Paulus, vergeht. Aber der Mensch ist für Paulus nicht nur Fleisch, er ist auch Leib. Und Geist. Und Herz. Und Wille. Und Gefühl. Und Verstand. Es wäre viel zu einseitig gesehen, wenn wir den Menschen nur als Fleisch, als eitel, als vergänglich ansehen würden, als Wind und als Hauch und als ein Haschen, das letztlich nichts festhalten kann, weil es spätestens nach 100 Jahren stirbt. Sie wissen, unser Leben währet 70 Jahre. Und wenn es hoch kommt, sind es 80 Jahre oder heute vielleicht auch 100. Und was daran köstlich war, sind Mühe und Arbeit gewesen. Aber nein, sagt Paulus, das ist doch nicht alles. Das ist viel zu negativ. Es stimmt zwar, dass Sie, dass ich, dass wir nicht wirklich weiterkommen, wenn wir unser Leben nur am Essen und Trinken und Überleben ausrichten. Wir sterben dann doch. Oder nur an unseren Kindern. An der Reproduktion. Auch unsere Kinder und Enkel und deren Enkel werden sterben. Mit unseren Kindern und deren Kinder erreichen wir den Himmel nicht. Das ist, so Paulus, da gibt er dem Prediger Recht, vergebliche Liebesmühe. Das ist fleischlich gedacht. Aber wir sind ja auch Geist! „Lasst Euch vom Geist leiten“ sagt Paulus, der Geist führt zum Leben. Das Fleisch führt zum Tod. Das „Fleisch streitet wider den Geist und der Geist wider das Fleisch; dieselben sind widereinander, dass Ihr nicht tut, was Ihr tun wollt“ (Galater 5, 17). Nun wollen wir uns aber, liebe Gemeinde, von Paulus unsere Freude an gutem Essen, das ja auch eine Gabe Gottes ist, nicht schlechtreden lassen und unsere Freude am Gelingen von befriedigender Sexualität. Das will er ja in Wirklichkeit auch nicht. Aber er hat damit Recht, dass beides nicht zur Ewigkeit führt. Vielmehr gibt der Geist, das überzeugt und begeistert Paulus, Anteil am ewigen Leben. „Die Frucht aber des Geistes ist Liebe, Freude, Friede, Geduld, Freundlichkeit Gütigkeit, Glaube, Sanftmut, Keuschheit … Wenn wir im Geist leben, so lasst uns auch im Geist wandeln (Galater 5, 22.25). Für ihn ist der Geist, der schon am Uranfang über den Wassern schwebt, mit dem Geist Gottes verbunden, dem Wind, Hauch, Geist, der als frischer Atem, der durch Mund und Kehle in unsere Lungen fließt und als Windhauch mit den Weiten des Universums verbindet. Derselbe Geist überwindet an Pfingsten die Grenzen der Sprache und sorgt für Verständigung. Derselbe Geist schließt uns an Gott an; er verschafft uns Zugang zu Gott. Er gibt uns die Chance, den Anfang und das Ende, Alpha und Omega, Gott und die Welt zusammen zu denken. Im Geist ist Gott in und unter uns gegenwärtig. Wir denken an ihn: Und er ist da. Wir rechnen mit ihm: Und er wirkt Wunder. Er ist mitten unter uns. Er ist eine Zauberkraft, ein Ozean, der sich nie erschöpft. Nietzsches toller Mensch liegt falsch. Niemand trank den Ozean Geist jemals aus. Und trotzdem rät Paulus bei aller Geistbegeisterung zur Vorsicht. Reden in Zungen ist gut, sagt er. Da vertritt uns der Geist vor Gott mit unaussprechlichen Seufzern. Aber besser fünf klare Worte mit Vernunft und Verstand als 10000 Worte in Zungen! Was nützt es uns, wenn keiner den anderen versteht? Nein. Der Geist ist großartig, weil er uns mit Gott und mit Christus verbindet. Wir sind Christen, weil der Geist Christi, weil Christi Aufmerksamkeit, Achtsamkeit und Liebe unter uns ist. Aber natürlich haben wir es auch mit anderen Geistern zu tun. Der Prediger hat einen anderen Geist als Paulus und Nietzsche wieder einen anderen. Und es gibt auch böse Geister. Es gibt Geister, die nicht am Leben interessiert sind, sondern am Tod. Deshalb kommt alles darauf an, dass wir, wenn wir unsere Fenster und Türen öffnen, die Geister zu unterscheiden lernen. Ich setze auf Gottes Geist. Gottes Geist gibt mir die Kraft, meinen Aufgaben in dieser Welt nachzukommen. Er schließt mich darüber hinaus an die Ewigkeit an. Und er gibt mir auch dann Zukunft, wenn diese Welt nicht mehr ist.

Amen.

> download as pdf

⇧top

 

Luft holen

Eröffnungs-Rede, Dr. Andrea Jahn, freie Kuratorin Stuttgart
Künstleraustauch Baden-Württemberg / Elsass:
Gauthier Sibillat und Rudolf Reiber zu Gast in der Kunststiftung Baden-Württemberg
October 7th, 2009

> download as pdf

⇧top

Im ersten Raum begegnen wir den neuen Arbeiten des 1974 in Frankfurt geborenen Künstlers Rudolf Reiber. Es sind Fotografien und Objekte, die sich direkt aufeinander beziehen unter dem Titel „Luft holen“. Die Fotografien zeigen Stadtsituationen, menschenleere, anonyme Winkel an Straßen und Plätzen, die in einem, zunächst unauffälligen Detail übereinstimmen: sie zeigen zurückgelassene Fahrradschlösser und tragen Titel, wie „London Air“, „L’air de Strasbourg“, „Berliner Luft“ oder „Stuttgarter Luft“.
Wenn Fahrradschlösser die Funktion haben, ein Rad zu sichern und es an seinem Platz festzuhalten, dann scheinen sie, wenn das Fahrrad fehlt, ihrer Existenzberechtigung beraubt. Sie sind nur noch Überbleibsel, Erinnerungen an die Möglichkeit zur Mobilität. Zugleich sind es ästhetische Objekte, die – übertragen aus dem Straßenraum in den Ausstellungsraum – zu Skulpturen werden. Darauf führt Reibers Installation hin: Die tatsächlichen, an der Wand befestigten Fahrradschlösser bekommen in dem Augenblick, in dem sie von ihrer Funktion befreit sind, etwas Skulpturales. Es sind geschlossene (!) Formen, die eine Vielzahl an Bedeutungen und Assozitionen entfalten können, Fundstücke, die auf den Fotos und auch als Wandobjekte eine eigene Geschichte erzählen. Und mehr noch: Es sind Ready-Mades in ihrem ursprünglichen Sinn! Für Marcel Duchamp, der bereits 1915 die ersten Ready-Mades entwickelt hatte, wurden sie in dem Moment zu Kunstwerken, in dem er die Objekte auswählte, ihren Standpunkt veränderte und sie signierte: „Er nahm einen gewöhnlichen Alltagsgegenstand, stellte ihn so auf, dass seine nützliche Bedeutung verschwand hinter einem neuen Titel und Standpunkt, und schuf einen neuen Gedanken für dieses Objekt.“
Reiber geht einen anderen Weg. Er wählt einen Alltagsgegenstand, wie das Fahrradschloss, verändert es aber nicht und verzichtet auf eine Signatur. Um es als Kunstwerk sichtbar zu machen, montiert er es an die Ausstellungswand oder bedient sich der Fotografie. Während Duchamp sein bekanntes Fahrrad-Rad umgedreht auf einen Schemel montierte, um es zum Kunstwerk zu machen, zeigt Rudolf Reiber die Fotografie von einem Rad ohne Rahmen, angeschlossen an einen Fahrradständer. Fahrrad-Rad und Schloss haben ihre Funktion verloren, indem etwas aus ihrem Kontext entfernt wurde: der Fahrrad-Rahmen. Ihre nützliche Bedeutung verschwindet durch eine Veränderung ihres Kontextes ohne unmittelbares Eingreifen des Künstlers. Doch ebenso wie Duchamp rückt Reiber mit dieser Fotografie einen veränderten Standpunkt in den Blick, um neue Gedanken für einen gewöhnlichen Alltagsgegenstand zu schaffen. Ein Fahrradschloss verändert schließlich selbst seine Umgebung, indem es unerwartet dort auftaucht, wo es eigentlich nicht hingehört. Der Stadtraum selbst bleibt anonym, und dennoch ist es dem Künstler wichtig, über den Titel einen Hinweis darauf herzustellen, wo diese Ready-Mades zu finden sind. Es sind „Orte für die Kunst“ – Berlin, London, Straßburg, New York, Frankfurt, Stuttgart, aber auch Sylt und Dänemark – Orte, an denen er selbst gearbeitet hat.
Es gibt eine Fotografie, auf der der Künstler dabei zu sehen ist, wie er auf einen Pfosten klettert, um ein Spiralschloss loszumachen. Es wird zur Metapher für Schutz, Verlust, festhalten und zugleich für Befreiung, losmachen, freisetzen. Es ist Platzhalter für etwas das fehlt, das einmal da war. Was bleibt ist Freiraum, Luft – „Stuttgarter Luft“, „Berliner Luft“, „London Air“ oder auch „l’air de Paris“, wie ein weiteres bekanntes Ready-Made von Marcel Duchamp.
Dass die Luft für Reiber eine besondere Rolle spielt, zeigen auch zwei Bilder, von denen eines im Ausstellungsraum und eines im Foyer hängt: „Sky Grey“ und „Sky Blue“ – monochrome Lackbilder, deren Farbe der Künstler zum Thema macht. Für Reiber handelt es sich bei diesen Bildern um „Himmelsausschnitte“, deren Farbton aus dem Repertoire der Royal Airforce stammt, die ihre Flugzeuge im Zweiten Weltkrieg zur Tarnung in bestimmten Blau- und Grautönen lackierte. Was bleibt ist die Farbe ohne das ursprüngliche Objekt, das Bild als Ausschnitt von der Welt, die hier ein Stück Himmel sein könnte. Ein Ausschnitt, dessen Täuschung den Tod bedeuten konnte. Ein weiteres Bild, dem wir noch weniger entgehen können, ist Reibers „Wandbild“, eine vor die Wand gehängte Glasplatte, in der wir nichts anderes sehen als die Wand und gleichzeitig uns selbst.

(...)

Andrea Jahn

> download as pdf

⇧top

 

KUNST Magazin Sammlergespräch:

Tommi Brem: Sackgassenkunst gefällt mir nicht – ich mag Sisyphoskunst

Jan Kage, Hannah Nehb

Gast des sechsten KUNST Sammlergesprächs war Tommi Brem, der sich für Konzeptkunst, Appropriation Art und dabei insbesondere für Mail-Art und Kunst, die das Thema Worte, Texte, Bücher und Literatur behandelt, interessiert, mit einem Faible für Sience-Fiction … und Punkte. Er besitzt Arbeiten von Karin Sander, Lasse Schmidt Hansen, Kris Martin, Troels Carlsen, Rudolf Reiber, Frank Kozik und David Horvitz sowie Editionen von Jonathan Monk, Fiona Banner und anderen.

> kunst-magazin.de

> download as pdf

⇧top

sky grey

Du sammelst erst seit zwei Jahren Kunst. Du hast einmal gesagt: „Eigentlich konnte ich Museen, Galerien, Vernissagen und Künstler nicht ausstehen.“ Was ist dann passiert?
Das Zitat geht noch weiter: „Kunst hat mich schon immer interessiert!“ In Stuttgart habe ich in einer tollen Firma gearbeitet. Mein Chef sammelte Kunst und hat die Onlineplattform „Independent Collectors“ (IC) ins Leben gerufen, damit sich Sammler online vernetzen können. Als ich mit ins Boot kam, fand ich es irgendwann merkwürdig, für eine Plattform für Kunstsammler zu arbeiten, ohne selbst zu sammeln. Also habe ich damit begonnen.

Was war die erste Arbeit, die du gekauft hast?
Ich habe im Internet eine Monopoledition von Jonathan Monk bestellt. Bei „The endless search for perfection“ hat Monk versucht, einen Drahtkleiderbügel so rund wie möglich zu biegen.

Wie informierst du dich über Strömungen, über Künstler?
Ich gehe natürlich auf Kunstmessen oder in Galerien. Aber ich recherchiere auch ganz viel online. Meist bekomme ich da einen Eindruck, ob ich das spannend finde oder nicht. Wenn mich  was total anspricht, dann bestelle ich das schon mal direkt, ohne es vorher live gesehen zu haben. Auch wenn es noch nie vorgekommen ist: Wenn es mir nicht gefiele, würde ich es wieder zurückschicken!

Warum ist es sinnvoll, wenn sich Sammler in einer Community wie „Independent Collectors“ vernetzen?
IC ist so was wie Facebook, allerdings nur für Sammler. Sammler aus der ganzen Welt können sich darüber austauschen, was sie sammeln, welche Künstler sie toll finden, welche Vernissagen sie empfehlen. Sie können zeigen, was sie so sammeln, um andere zu inspirieren und sich inspirieren zu lassen. Es passiert auch, dass ein Mitglied z. B. nach Moskau fährt und dann vorher die Moskauer Mitglieder anschreibt und fragt, was die für Tipps haben und empfehlen können.

Wenn du auf Messen oder in Galerien nach Kunst suchst, profitierst du dann als junger Sammler davon, dass du bei „Independent Collectors“ arbeitest?
Die Verbindung mit „Independent Collectors“ ermöglicht einem einen anderen Einstieg. Es ist auch angenehm, mit einem anderen Sammler, z. B. mit Christian Schwarm, unterwegs zu sein. Wäre ich am Anfang ganz alleine gewesen, hätte das sicher frustrierend sein können. Du lernst sehr viel, wenn dir andere Tipps geben. Wenn sie nachhaken und dadurch deine Wahrnehmung und dein Urteilsvermögen schulen. Mit der Zeit lernt man zu sagen: „Das gefällt mir nicht, weil …“ Es ist zwar schwierig, dieses „weil“ zu konkretisieren, doch gerade dieses „weil“ ist es, was die Sache spannend macht!

Reden wir über das Spannende. Was gefällt dir denn nicht?
Sackgassenkunst, also Kunst, die laut nach Aufmerksamkeit schreit, bei der dann aber nichts weiter passiert. Zum Beispiel Damien Hirsts Spot Paintings. Ich mag Arbeiten, die zum Nachdenken anregen, hinter denen ein für mich überzeugendes Konzept steht.

Wofür bist du denn dann sofort Feuer und Flamme?
Ich mag „Sisyphoskunst“! Wenn sich der Künstler sehr zeitintensive, mühsame Projekte vornimmt. Wenn zum Beispiel Jonathan Monk 100 Kleiderbügel bügelt, ist das Sisyphosarbeit. Man fragt sich: Warum tut der sich das an? Ich finde es spannend, wenn Rudolf Reiber 48.085 Sterne vom Nachthimmel abmalt, um die Sternwanderung zu dokumentieren, oder wenn Carine Weve 1547 Karteikarten bestempelt. Monochrome Flächen finde ich spannend, da interessiert mich das Konzept dahinter. Solche Arbeiten sind erklärungsbedürftig – aber nicht für mich, denn ich kenne ja die Geschichte, die dahintersteckt.

Du sammelst kein expressionistisches „Farbe-an-die-Wand-Klatschen“, sondern klare Strukturen.
Rudolf Reibers Serie „German Skies“ zeigt monochrome graue Flächen. Die Alliierten hatten mit dieser Farbe die Unterseite ihrer Kampfflugzeuge lackiert, damit sie am Himmel nicht so gut zu erkennen waren. Es gab Sky Grey und Sky Blue. Sky Grey ist die hässlichste Farbe von allen, das Bild habe ich dann bestellt. Und irgendwie steckt auch was Persönliches dahinter, denn meine Heimatstadt Ulm wurde im Zweiten Weltkrieg stark zerbombt.

Wie viele Kunstwerke hast du in den letzten zwei Jahren gekauft?
Ich schätze vierzig. Ich habe auch ein paar Platten gekauft, etwa von einem finnischen Künstler, der elf Musiker überredet hat, Coverversionen von einem Song einzuspielen, den er mal mit 16 geschrieben hat und der eigentlich nicht so gut war. Ich finde das eine coole Sache! David Horvitz ist einer meiner Lieblingskünstler. Man überweist ihm beispielsweise einen Dollar, damit er eine Minute lang an einen denkt. Dann bekommt man eine E-Mail, „I’m starting to think about you now“, und nach einer Minute noch eine: „Your minute is up. It was really nice thinking about you.“  Er macht auch Ausflüge, für die man ihm Geld überweisen kann, zum Beispiel 25,30 Euro. Er macht dann was Lustiges. Ich habe mit anderen Sammlern zusammengelegt und eine „Gruppenreise“ gebucht. Er fuhr dann nach Istanbul.

Konntet ihr euch wünschen, in welche Stadt er fahren soll?
Nein, er bekam von jedem die gleiche Summe, und wir wussten nicht, was er damit machen würde. Er hat in Istanbul einen Fischer überredet, ihn mit seinem Boot mit aufs Meer zu nehmen. Das hat er dokumentiert und uns schöne Fotos und eine Postkarte geschickt.

(Frage aus dem Publikum) Wie viele Künstler, die Sie sammeln, kennen Sie persönlich?
Nun, ich habe circa vierzig Arbeiten, fast alle von verschiedenen Künstlern. Persönlich kennengelernt habe ich nur David Horvitz, Jonathan Monk und Rudolf Reiber, in dessen Atelier ich auch war.

Diese Frage haben wir fast allen Sammlern gestellt. Man kann fast eine Typologie erstellen: Manchen ist der Kontakt zum Künstler völlig egal, andere legen großen Wert darauf und machen Atelierbesuche.
Ich finde den Kontakt mit dem Künstler sehr spannend – wenn er denn entsteht. Vielleicht hätte ich „Sky Grey“ nicht gekauft, wenn ich Rudolf Reiber nicht persönlich kennen würde.

Auf deinem Blog bei Independent Collectors erzählst du in einem 8-Minuten-Video, wie du zum Kunstsammeln gekommen bist, so Bob-Dylan-mäßig mit Karteikarten, die du dann immer wegwirfst. Am Ende sagst du: „Nach einem Jahr Kunstsammeln habe ich festgestellt: Mir fehlt der Rock!“ Was ist für dich Rock in der Kunst? Hast du ihn gefunden?
Rock bedeutet für mich, dass man Sachen weniger ernst nimmt, ein bisschen mehr aufs Bauchgefühl hört und einfach mal was ausprobiert. Rock ist Kunst, die ein bisschen lockerer ist, die eine gewisse Leichtigkeit hat.

2009 hast du dir mehr Rock gewünscht. Was wünschst du dir 2010 für dein drittes Sammeljahr?
Ich wünsche mir mehr Mut. Ich will mich trauen, etwas zu kaufen, wenn es zwar etwas schmerzt, aber ich es unbedingt haben will. Ich habe da ein paar Arbeiten im Auge, zum Beispiel von Christian Andersson, Sachen für 9000 Euro. Ich wünsche mir für 2010, den Arsch in der Hose zu haben, damit ich bekomme, was ich haben will!

Den Mut dafür wünschen wir dir! Vielen Dank für das Gespräch.
Tommi Brem (*1977) studierte Bühnenbau in Liverpool und arbeitete als Texter und Grafiker. Mit dem Kunstsammeln hat er als eine Art Experiment am 4. Juni 2008 begonnen, angestiftet durch seinen Chef Christian Schwarm von der Werbeagentur Dorten. Auch heute arbeitet Brem noch mit Christian Schwarm zusammen, inzwischen ist er fester Mitarbeiter der Onlinecommunity „Independent Collectors“, die weltweit Sammler miteinander vernetzt.

> kunst-magazin.de

> download as pdf

⇧top

 



art, das Kunstmagazin

Radar: RIK REINKING ÜBER RUDOLF REIBER

> art-magazin

> download as pdf

⇧top

mehr licht
"Mehr Licht": Rudolf Reiber entfernte in jedem Wolkenkratzer das 13. Stockwerk

RIK REINKING ÜBER RUDOLF REIBER
Für unsere neue Serie "Radar" fragen wir jede Woche Sammler, Kuratoren, Dozenten und Kritiker nach ihrem aktuellen Lieblingskünstler. Diesmal: der Hamburger Sammler, Händler und Kurator Rik Reinking, 32, über den Frankfurter Künstler Rudolf Reiber.
// RIK REINKING


Wen ich momentan auf dem "Radar" habe: Rudolf Reiber. Er ist derzeit noch relativ unbekannt und hat auch noch keine Galerievertretung. Seine Arbeiten verfolge ich aber schon seit längerem. Erstmals aufgefallen ist er mir 2005 bei der "Fraktale IV" im Berliner Palast der Republik mit seiner Videoinstallation "The Drive", in der er uns mit seiner aus drei Projektionen bestehenden Installation in die freie Natur zu einer Jagdgesellschaft einlud, die jedoch nie zum Schuss kommt. Indem er die Erwartungshaltung des Betrachters nicht erfüllt, treibt er die Spannung bis ins Unerträgliche.

Im letzten Jahr stellte Reiber im Haus der Kunst in Brno und München aus und war auf der 10. Biennale in Istanbul vertreten. Gerade erscheint sein umfangreicher Katalog "Blast of Silence", der einen ersten Überblick über sein Werk ermöglicht.

Rudolf Reiber ist 1974 in Frankfurt am Main geboren und hat in Stuttgart studiert. Sein Werk umfasst sowohl Videos, Installationen als auch Fotoarbeiten. Seine Arbeiten verbinden aber auch zeichnerische und skulpturale Ansätze. Will man sein Wek verstehen, muss man die Parameter Raum, Zeit und Leere mit einbeziehen.

So schliff er für seine Arbeit "Ohne Titel"(2004) die Prägung einer Ein-Euro-Münze über Monate von Hand soweit herunter, bis nur noch eine glatt glänzende Scheibe übrig blieb. Hierdurch entzog er dem Metall zwar seinen gesellschaftlichen Sinn und raubte dem Staate einen Euro, was aber bleibt, ist eine durch die langwierige Arbeit entstandene Projektionsfläche, in der sich der Betrachter wiedererkennt.

Die Fotoarbeit "Mehr Licht" zeigt die Skyline Frankfurts. Nicht zu erkennen ist, dass Reiber in jedem Wolkenkratzer das 13. Stockwerk entfernte, das ja tatsächlich in Hochhäusern aus Aberglaube oft nicht existiert, um eingedenk der letzten Worte Goethes der Innenstadt "mehr Licht" zu verschaffen.

Für seine Arbeit "Dark Matter" (2007) ging er ähnlich vor. Ausgangspunkt war eine Fotografie des Sternenhimmels von Thomas Ruff. Rudolf Reiber löschte in mühsamer Arbeit mittels Retuschiertusche jeden der 52 873 Sterne einzeln aus und schuf so eine schwarze Fläche, die den Noch-nicht-Weltraum vor dem "Big Bang" zeigt. Entstanden ist ein schwarzes Rechteck.

Dies zeigt Reibers Haltung zur Revolte: Jemand, der gegen das System arbeitet, aber nicht wie Robert Rauschenberg, mit dem Wunsch nach Zerstörung, sondern vielmehr, um etwas zu reparieren.

> art-magazin

> download as pdf

⇧top

 

Kunstforum international

Band 178, 2005, S. 287

Roland Schappert
FRAKTALE IV
»25 Positionen zeitgenössischer Kunst zum Phänomen Tod«
Palast der Republik, Berlin, 17.09 - 19.11.2005

> Kunstforum international

⇧top

Einer wird nach dem Ende der Ausstellungszeit nun endgültig sterben: Der Palast der Republik. 1990 wurde er bereits geschlossen und von 1998 bis 2001 im Rahmen einer Asbestsanierung völlig entkernt. So ließ man ihn dann von außen und innen vergammeln und er schien mausetot und völlig deplatziert auf seinen Abbruch zu warten. Ein Bundestagsbeschluss sollte schließlich jeden Wiederbelebungsversuch im Keime ersticken. Das Geld für einen Abbruch fehlte die letzten Jahre immer mehr, aber reaktionäre Politiker schritten in Gedanken schon längst durch ein wiederaufzuerstehendes Stadtschloss - in Erinnerung an das alte Stadtschloss, welches 1950 auf Beschluss der DDR-Führung gesprengt wurde. Da versuchten […] weiterlesen

> Kunstforum international

⇧top